06
Mar
10

The Green Prince

This has got to be one of the most interesting stories I’ve read in a long time.

Avi Issacharof of Haaretz reveals that Mosab Hassan Yosef, the son of the leader of Hamas in the West Bank, was actually an Israeli agent working for the Shin Bet.

Apparently, the guy saved hundreds of lives and basically gave the Shabak access to the highest levels of Hamas.

The article is an excellent read, but Channel 2 did an interview with the guy last night (in English) – and pictures, of course, are worth a thousand words.

Take a look:

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6 Responses to “The Green Prince”


  1. March 6, 2010 at 17:57

    Ah yes, Mosab the traitor. Eh. Pity such people even exist, but what can you do.

    Seriously though, on an intellectual level – imagine the man was Mongolian or Namibian or whatever location we have no emotional connection to – how would we feel vis-a-vis a man who betrayed his people – his own father, even – sold his leaders to their sworn enemy, then ran off to the US and got a book deal out of it?

    Sheer disgust.

    • 2 Ami Kaufman
      March 6, 2010 at 18:09

      But that’s just it – neither you nor I can discuss it on the intellectual level, when feelings are involved. I can understand his father feeling betrayed, but if he indeed saved the lives of innocent citizens from a suicide attack – I can only think highly of him, as an Israeli – no?

      • 3 Ami Kaufman
        March 6, 2010 at 18:15

        Here’s another hypothetical: Let’s say we’re talking about Sri Lanka, and you and I favor the struggle of the Tamil Tigers. Let’s say there’s a version of Mosab there, who foils Tamil suicide attacks against innocents in Colombo, saying it’s for peace and so forth. How would u feel, even though we’re both rooting for the Tigers?

      • March 7, 2010 at 00:30

        I’ll have you notice that Mosab was also giving locations of Palestinians to the Shabak. The whole “I was saving lives” and “I’m doing it for peace” is nonsense – it is but the PR translation of “they paid me well” and “I was promised a Green Card in exchange for betraying my own”.

        What do you call an Israeli soldier who would call Hamas to warn them that an army unit was going to conduct an operation somewhere, and give them the details of the op so that Hamas could arrest those soldiers, throw them in prison or execute them – and in the process saving the Palestinian lives that the IDF would’ve obliterated?

        A traitor. there’s no way around it.

        I do understand that Israelis are this close to dedicating a Mosab Day, which is why in my original comment I suggested we tried to dissociate ourselves a little, difficult as it may be…
        sometimes it’s things like that that remind me that we’re standing at opposite sides.

  2. 5 Ami Kaufman
    March 7, 2010 at 08:13

    Oh no, trust me – Israelis won’t dedicate Mosab his own day. In fact, most people won’t remember who he is by next week.
    I also understood from the article that he was indeed giving locations of what my side would call “terrorists”, so in a way he was saving lives, no?
    As for your translation of his payment and greencard, I can’t relate to that – it’s not written in Issacharof’s piece as far as I can remember. But I’m not saying you’re wrong. That very well could have been the case. I believe we only know the tip of the iceberg with this story.
    But I agree with you on most points (Yes, I would call that Israeli soldier a traitor and yes, I do see Mosab as a traitor to Hamas – but not to his people), although I’m not sure about your example, seeing as how the lives of Hamas men would be saved, as I was comparing to innocent lives of citizens in a suicide attack. Truth is, we could go back and forth with the hypotheticals forever.
    Mo, I could hear the disappointment in your voice in your last sentence. Yup, it hurts when reality hits you in the face. We are on different sides (we were born into them, we didn’t chose), but different sides don’t have to be enemies.
    I go back to my first comment, that we and others can not disconnect ourselves because we’re too deep emotionally in it. That’s the basis of every conflict, especially this one.
    We can be buddies, but at the end of the day – each has to root for their home team, right?

    • March 8, 2010 at 02:05

      There’s no way to defend Israel’s assassinations – extrajudicial killings, to be precise – first because if we start sentencing and executing the people we perceive to be bad without due process, it’s only a downhill road from there.

      Plus, it’s never A Hamas guy who’s murdered. It’s him, and the three cars and 17 pedestrians unlucky enough to be around him.
      Come on now. By the same logic, next time there’ an Israeli mole who get half the army told leadership murder, I’ll refer to him as a “traitor to Likud but not to his people”.

      I fully understand why you don’t relate to my comparisons, obviously… We have different conceptions of good and bad guys. Personally, the Israeli army is guilty of war crimes and state terrorism – the IDF leadership is not worth an iota more than Hamas’. In fact, I definitely pick a Hassan Youssef over a Dan Halutz.

      I’m not disappointed. I’m sad. It’s very different..

      As for the gentleman on face it. Mosab Youssef is horrible person have we learned nothing from the Godfather? “Never take sides with anyone against the family”! 🙂 – and I hope he never has a quiet night of sleep, ever again.


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